Posts tagged art

Even the ancients are dirtier than me. Dating back to 330 BC in Corinth this bronze mirror is known as “The Lioness”

Even the ancients are dirtier than me. Dating back to 330 BC in Corinth this bronze mirror is known as “The Lioness”

1 note

Be uncertain of your ideas, but not your purpose.

“Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.” – Voltaire

Feeling certain can be a large burden for creative endeavors.

The inventor who goes out in search of what he is confident to be an ideal, perfect machine, is doomed for failure. By being married to his vision of what his invention should be, he doesn’t see the better solution just around the edges.

We can see this problem almost every day. We all settle into ideas because we’re so sure they’ll work, and when they don’t work we keep pushing on them, spending countless hours to try and fit our square peg of an idea into the round hole of a goal.

Instead, our creative process should be the opposite. We shouldn’t be married to ideas, we should instead be married to goals, visions, and purposes.

If your purpose is to create artwork that inspires, creating art using only crayons may not be the best way to go about it. If your vision is to be the best improv actor this side of the globe, you can’t be married to the idea that opening your own theater is the way to get there. This is important because wasting your time on an idea that isn’t working is just that: a waste of time. Pursuing ideas that aren’t right means you’re wasting time that you could otherwise be devoting to the right efforts.

Being married to an idea is an efficient way to waste energy and resources.

It’s natural to pursue certainty, but it’s unnatural to align that certainty to mere ideas. Instead, be open to the fact that your ideas may not be the best, that there may be a better solution waiting for you to discover it. Instead of defining yourself by your ideas, define yourself by your goals and vision.

Creative insights often hide here, just outside where we’re so certain they are.

(Source: creativesomething.net)

If we’d only grown up with a strong woman role model in society…

If we’d only grown up with a strong woman role model in society…

2 notes

Grants I could Actually Get.

The Astraea Visual Arts Fund
Who: Contemporary lesbian visual artists working in ursculpte, painting, prints, mixed media, and works on paper

When: Date not available for 2013 yet
How Much: $2,500

Each year three grants are given, two of which are supported by an endowed gift from Joan Watts, a founding member and artist. Glittery portraitist Mickalene Thomas was a panelist for 2008/2009.

[Fine Print]: Candidates must show a commitment to social-justice feminism.

***

The Awesome Foundation For the Arts and Sciences
Who: The awesome amongst us
When: Awarded monthly. Applications are rolling.  
How Much: $1,000

The Awesome Foundation is a loose network of small-time philanthropists who award $1,000 micro-grants to people with certifiably awesome ideas every month. Chapters consist of 10 trustees who each donate $100. The project can be artistic, scientific, and/or social in nature. Previous “awesome” projects have included a giant hammock in Boston, a mushroom farm made out of phone books in Ottawa, and a portable pipe organ.

[Fine Print]None — this grant is that awesome.

***

College Art Association Professional Development Grant
Who: Students
When: Annually. Applications will be available in May.
How Much: $5,000

The College Art Association’s (CCA) Professional-Development Fellowships offers awards to aspiring artists and art historians currently enrolled in MFA and PhD programs. The transition from school to “the real world” can be tough. Fortunately, the CCA is there to cushion the blow with unrestricted grants of $5,000, free one-year CAA membership, and complimentary registration to the CCA’s Annual Conference where you can network with fellow strivers.

Notable Grantees: Mary Reid Kelley, LaToya Ruby Frazer

[Fine Print]: Applicants must receive their MFA or PhD degree in the calendar year following the year of application.

(Source: artinfo.com)

I came across an anatomical structure about a year ago, called the ‘labioscrotal fold’. It is found at 5-10 weeks in human development and is described as an undifferentiated, bi-sexual organ. The explicit permutations of adult sex organs found in this set of 70 small ceramic sculptures are a direct reflection on this. 

I came across an anatomical structure about a year ago, called the ‘labioscrotal fold’. It is found at 5-10 weeks in human development and is described as an undifferentiated, bi-sexual organ. The explicit permutations of adult sex organs found in this set of 70 small ceramic sculptures are a direct reflection on this.